Frankenstein by Ludworst Bemonster – Saturday Story Spotlight

Welcome to Saturday Story Spotlight, my feature where I discuss books my husband and I are reading with our children. These are books that they, we, or all of us particularly enjoy.

Frankenstein: A Monstrous Parody by Ludworst Bemonster (Rick Walton and Nathan Hale)
Published by Feiwel & Friends, an imprint of Macmillan

I doubt I am alone in this, but when I was young I simply adored Ludwig Bemelmans’s Madeleine. In Frankenstein, Rick Walton and Nathan Hale – writing under the pseudonym Ludworst Bemonster – parodies the beloved childhood classic to monstrous effect. Their main character, as you might expect, is a little Frankenstein, although instead of the littlest of them, he is the ugliest one.

The first portion of Frankenstein is particularly clever. Bemonster has a good ear for the rhyme and meter of the original Madeleine and the story is cute. The monsters’s teacher Miss Devel wakes one night, certain that something is quite wrong and finds that Frankenstein has, quite literally, lost his head.

Frankenstein has some really great ‘spooky’ vocabulary. Things are grotesque and gory, full of shrieks and howls and groans, the monsters torment Miss Devel. The plot loses a bit of steam at the end, though, particularly after what should be the end of the book. There are two more pages of illustration that are so anti-climatic that they nearly ruin the entire book.

Of course, that is all from an adult’s point of view. Daniel, who is now three years old and has never read Madeleine, thoroughly enjoys Frankenstein. He has pronounced it his “favorite,” seemingly due to the good cadence and rhyme, as well as the cutely spooky illustrations.

Buy this book from:
Powells*| Indiebound*

Source: Publisher
* These links are all affiliate links. If you buy your book here I’ll make a very small amount of money that goes towards hosting, giveaways, etc.
Digiprove sealCopyright protected by Digiprove © 2012

The Gingerbread Man – Saturday Story Spotlight

Welcome to Saturday Story Spotlight, my feature where I discuss books my husband and I are reading with our son, Daniel. These are books that he, we, or all of us particularly enjoy.

The Gingerbread Man illustrated by Karen Schmidt
Published by Scholastic Paperbacks, an imprint of Scholastic

I’m sure you all know the basics of this one: gingerbread man comes to life, taunts those who attempt to chase him, becomes over-confident, gets eaten by a fox.

We started reading this with Daniel around Thanksgiving and it became a favorite in no time and has been an oft-requested book for the entirety of winter (or what has passed for winter this year, anyway). Most of the time Daniel now “reads” this to us, at the very least reciting the gingerbread man’s lines “Run, run, run, as fast as you can, you can’t catch me I’m the gingerbread man!” Actually, he doesn’t just recite those lines when we’re reading the book, if he’s running (particularly if he’s running AWAY from us around the house) he is extremely likely to be shouting the same lines.

The predictive text in this book is great for a pre-reader like Daniel, but what is even better is how much it has captured his imagination.

Buy this book from:
Powells | Indiebound*

Source: Personal copy
* These links are all affiliate links. If you buy your book here I’ll make a very small amount of money that goes towards hosting, giveaways, etc.
Digiprove sealCopyright protected by Digiprove © 2012

Dot – Saturday Story Spotlight

Welcome to Saturday Story Spotlight, my feature where I discuss books my husband and I are reading with our son, Daniel. These are books that he, we, or all of us particularly enjoy.

Dot by Patricia Intriago
Published by Margaret Ferguson Books, an imprint of Macmillan

Patricia Intriago’s Dot is a stark, sparse study in opposites. There are dots that are up and down, happy and sad, yummy and taste bad. Having the illustrations consist of little more than dots set against a solid background – most often black dots on white – means that there is little to distract from the attributes that define each set of dots. Daniel is particularly taken with the dots that are yummy and taste bad. Each of the two appears to have a bite taken out of it, but the bad-tasting dot has its missing piece next to it on the page, as if someone tasted it and then spit it out. Every time Daniel sees Dot, he grabs the book from my hand and starts flipping through the pages asking, “where yummy one?”

Although it isn’t as ornately illustrated as most of the picture books we read, Dot is attention-grabbing in its simplicity, as evidenced by the fact that Daniel latched onto one of the sets of dots almost immediately, after only one or two reads. We are enjoying Dot very much.

Buy this book from:
Powells | Indiebound*

Source: Publisher
* These links are all affiliate links. If you buy your book here I’ll make a very small amount of money that goes towards hosting, giveaways, etc.
Digiprove sealCopyright protected by Digiprove © 2011

Bring On the Birds – Saturday Story Spotlight

Welcome to Saturday Story Spotlight, my feature where I discuss books my husband and I are reading with our son, Daniel. These are books that he, we, or all of us particularly enjoy.

Bring On the Birds by Susan Stockdale
Published by Peachtree Publishing

Daniel has a new obsession when we are outside: birds.

Of course, the variety of birds we see around here isn’t so great, mostly I don’t think there is enough variation that he can even tell one bird from another, with the exception of the geese, ducks, and maybe the robins. With his current obsession he is really enjoying Susan Stockdale’s Bring On the Birds.

Stockdale’s book combines a great rhythm and rhyme with gorgeous illustrations, while at the same time describing the breadth of diversity among birds – diversity we don’t see so much here in the Midwest. Daniel is a little young for this to be more than a general exposure to the fact that these are all birds, but parents of older children could have discussions about diversity and all the different ways that birds live. The text is relatively simple and there isn’t much of it on each page, but Bring On the Birds could potentially be used for children up to 2nd or 3rd grade to talk about biodiversity.

This would be a great title to go out and get to read to your child for Earth Day.

Buy this book from:
PowellsIndiebound*

Peachtree publishing is sponsoring a blog tour of many of their Earth Day-appropriate titles. Here are the posts from last week:

 

Monday 4/11:
A Word’s Worth – *Review of At the Sea Floor Café
Archimedes Notebook – *Review of Planting the Wild Garden
Tuesday 4/12:
A Patchwork of Books – Guest post by Melissa Stewart, author of A Place for Fish
Abby the Librarian – Review of Bring On the Birds
Jenn’s Bookshelves – *Review of A Place for Fish
Wednesday 4/13:
Simply Science – Review of At the Sea Floor Café
Book Dads – Review of Planting the Wild Garden
Archimedes Notebook – *Interview with Kathryn O. Galbraith, author of Planting the Wild Garden
There’s a Book – *Review of A Place for Fish
Thursday 4/14:
Book Dads – Interview with Wendy Anderson Halperin, illustrator of Planting the Wild Garden
A Word’s Worth – *Review of About Habitats: Grasslands
Abby the Librarian – Interview with Susan Stockdale, author/illustrator of Bring On the Birds
Friday 4/15:
There’s a Book – Interview with Melissa Stewart, author of A Place for Fish
Jenn’s Bookshelves – Review of Planting the Wild Garden

 

 

Source: Publisher
* These links are all affiliate links. If you buy your book here I’ll make a very small amount of money that goes towards hosting, giveaways, etc.
Digiprove sealCopyright protected by Digiprove © 2011