A White Wind Blew by James Markert – Book Review

A White Wind Blew by James Markert
Published by Sourcebooks Landmark, an imprint of Sourceboks

Wolfgang Pike is a man who is not entirely sure of his place in life. He has long thought that he might become a priest, but plan took a detour when he met Rose, and again when he came to work at Waverly Hills. Waverly Hills is one of the top tuberculosis sanitariums in the United States, and with the way the disease is raging, they need all the help they can get. Although he lost his dear wife, Wolfgang cannot bring himself to go back to his priestly studies as long as Waverly needs him so much. Not that there is much that anyone can do for tuberculosis at this point, in the wake of World War I. But although there is little that can be done medically, Wolfgang has faith in the power of music to heal – or at least help – those whose suffering is the greatest. It is with this in mind that Wolfgang begins to build his orchestra, despite the fact that his boss believes the exercise potentially harmful and a complete waste of time.

I really, thoroughly enjoyed A White Wind Blew. I am often not super keen about historical fiction set in America (except maybe that set in the 19th century), so I was a bit hesitant. However, Markert has written a book with real heart – and which also benefits from such an interesting setting as a tuberculosis sanitarium.

A White Wind Blew is lovely and a very diverting way to spend an afternoon. Recommended.

Check out my interview with James Markert in the SheKnows Book Lounge.

Buy this book from:
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Source: Publisher.
* These links are all affiliate links. If you buy your book here I’ll make a very small amount of money that goes towards hosting, giveaways, etc.

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The Song Remains the Same by Allison Winn Scotch – Book Review

The Song Remains the Same by Allison Winn Scotch
Published by Putnam Books, an imprint of Penguin

When Nell Slattery wakes up in a hospital in Iowa, she knows nothing. Not how she got there, not who the people are surrounding her, not who she is. It was a flight from New York to San Francisco, and when it crashed she was one of only two survivors, the other being her B-list actor seatmate, Anderson Carroll. Although Anderson remembers horrible detail, Nell’s amnesia does not seem to be going away, not even in regards to her life before the crash. Luckily, Nell has her mother, husband, and sister/business partner around her to help fill her in on who she used to be. Unfortunately, each of these people has his or her own perspective on Nell’s life, what it was and what they wish it had been, and their stories for Nell reflect these wished for realities. Now, all Nell knows is that she knows nothing, and that she cannot fully trust what is told to her. It will be up to her and any outside help she can muster to sort out the life she used to lead, and the one she will lead going forward.

As always, Allison Winn Scotch has created a complex and moving story of identity and choosing what life to live. Nell’s story is affecting, not as much the tragic accident which she can’t remember, but her journey to remembrance, the decisions she must make about where to conform to what she knows of her former life and where to attempt to be a new and improved person. Certainly a story about a tragic accident and amnesia could have easily been trite, in soap opera territory, but Winn Scotch deftly avoids these traps and gives readers a book that is authentic, without resorting to cookie cutter genre conventions.

The Song Remains The Same is a new take on amnesia stories, and one written with the heart that I have come to expect from Allison Winn Scotch. Highly recommended.

Buy this book from:
Powells | Indiebound*

Source: Author.
* These links are all affiliate links. If you buy your book here I’ll make a very small amount of money that goes towards hosting, giveaways, etc.

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