If the Shoe Fits by Megan Mulry – Book Review

If the Shoe Fits by Megan Mulry
Published by Sourcebooks Landmark, an imprint of Sourcebooks

I previously reviewed the first book in this series, A Royal Pain.

Max and Bronte are finally getting their happily ever after and of course Bronte’s dear friend Sarah has to be at the wedding. As a woman who has focused much more on her career than her love life, Sarah is less than experienced in the bedroom, but Max’s rakish younger brother only sees a ravishing young woman. When Sarah proposes that the two of them have a fun and commitment-free weekend, Devon thinks he has hit the jackpot. As he begins to spend time with the smart and beguiling young woman, though, Devon realizes that she is far more than he bargained for – she’s the woman for him, if only he can convince her of that.

Oh, you guys, I’m loving on this series so hard. They are just FUN. I actually think I liked If the Shoe Fits even more than I did A Royal Pain. Part of it is that Sarah James is just such a lovely heroine, even better than Bronte. I also loved Devon even more than Maxwell, although part of this – for both characters, actually – is that I had already met them in A Royal Pain, so I was invested in their lives much more quickly than I might have otherwise been.

Sure, If the Shoe Fits follows formulas and conventions of its genre, but Mulry does it with such a great voice and such fabulous characters that it still feels fresh and wonderful. Highly recommended.

Okay, guys, so evidently I *d0* like some romances. I’m thinking in addition to stuff like this I would might like historical romances. Any recommendations?

For more information, see the publisher’s page
Source: Publisher.

 

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A Royal Pain by Megan Mulry – Book Review

A Royal Pain by Megan Mulry
Published by Sourcebooks Landmark, an imprint of Sourcebooks

Once burned, twice shy.

This describes Bronte perfectly. She was once a smart, sexy, professional woman, but then she met the Texan. He seemed so wonderful when they were meeting on the weekends. When she left her job in New York and moved to Chicago to be with him? Not so much. Now Bronte is finally healing a bit, and to do so she’s guarding her independence very closely. When she meets Maxwell, the handsome British man getting an advanced economics degree at the University of Chicago, she decides that they need to be no-strings-attached. Maxwell is happy with their situation , but just for the time being. You see, Maxwell is convinced that he has met the woman who will one day become his wife and he knows something Bronte doesn’t: the woman who becomes his wife will also become the Duchess of Northrop.

A Royal Pain is a lot of fun. In some (very obvious) ways, it reminds me of The American Heiress by Daisy Goodwin. Both feature American girls running off to become British royalty. As might be expected from the contemporary setting, Bronte and Maxwell’s relationship is certainly more of a love match – Maxwell’s family is still quite wealthy – but despite some major differences, some of the same difficulties remain. Maxwell is, at times, a bit controlling. Much of this can perhaps be put down to cultural differences, but even just the fact that he decides Bronte is his future wife and doesn’t bother telling her for quite awhile is occasionally off-putting. I must also say that I got tired of hearing about their mind-blowing sex they were having during their no-strings-attached time. Of course, I’m not typically a reader of romance novels, so perhaps I found it particularly tedious.

Despite some weaknesses, though, Mulry’s characters – Bronte in particular – are vivid and do a remarkably good job at taking up residence in the reader’s brain. For days after finishing A Royal Pain, I found myself thinking about the book, wondering how Bronte might be doing after the end. Say what you will about any of its faults, the ability of A Royal Pain to stay with me like that is, to me, the mark of a good book.

Buy this book from:
Powells | Indiebound*

Source: Publisher.
* These links are all affiliate links. If you buy your book here I’ll make a very small amount of money that goes towards hosting, giveaways, etc.

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The Sister Queens by Sophie Perinot – Book Review

The Sister Queens by Sophie Perinot
Published by NAL Trade, an imprint of Penguin

As girls, Eleanor and Marguerite are nearly inseparable, although much of their togetherness includes competition – particularly on Eleanor’s part as she attempts to keep up with her lovely and mild older sister. Unfortunately for Eleanor and Marguerite, fate does not allow for them to be together forever; as the daughters of the Duke of Provence and members of the de Savoy family on their mother’s side, the sisters are fated to make grand marriages. In fact, Marguerite will be the Queen of France and Eleanor Queen of England. Although equal in status, the sisters’ marriages are vastly unequal. Louis IX, King of France is a vastly superior king as compared to England’s Henry III, but Henry cares deeply for Eleanor, while Louis all but ignores Marguerite. Although separated by the English Channel and antagonistic countries, the sisters do have one another’s hearts and letters to guide them through the perils of queenship.

Marguerite, Eleanor, and their two younger sisters have fascinating stories, all four actually became queens. Sanchia of Provence became Queen of Germany and Beatrice Queen of Sicily. Perinot has chosen to focus on the first half of Marguerite and Eleanor’s reigns as queens of France and England, however, before their sisters ascended to their thrones as well. The Sister Queens is a solid work of historical fiction. Both Eleanor and Marguerite are well-developed characters, which is impressive, since they share narration of the book. Even more impressive is the way Perinot causes the reader to favor and commiserate with first one sister and then the other as they take turns relating their stories, it is easy to see both sides of the personal and political issues at stake.

The settings could perhaps have been explored in greater detail, but to fully describe the political situations of both countries would have seriously inflated the page count and possibly bogged down the story Perinot is telling. In addition, while the letters between the women sometimes seemed slightly over-expository, they did serve to get much of the exposition out of the way so that the majority of the story could be focused on the characters and not on the intervening events.

All in all, a satisfying read about a time period and family about which comparatively little is written. Recommended.

Buy this book from:
Powells | Indiebound*

Source: Author.
* These links are all affiliate links. If you buy your book here I’ll make a very small amount of money that goes towards hosting, giveaways, etc.

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