Sticks and Stones by Emily Bazelon – Book Review

Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy by Emily Bazelon
Published by Random House

The big bad wolf in the raising of teenagers today is cyber bullying. If you believe Emily Bazelon, however, cyber bullying is not a new thing. It is, she claims, essentially nothing more than plain old bullying, moved to a new venue. What, then, is bullying? In Sticks and Stones, Bazelon unpacks the issue of bullying through three case studies, discussing interventions, suicide, and, of course, the role of the internet.

Honestly, I’m not sure I would have ever picked this one up had I not been interviewing Bazelon about it for the SheKnows Book Lounge. I expected Sticks and Stones to either be self-help-y or to be a dry recitation of the facts of bullying. Happily, it is neither. Instead, Sticks and Stones is a book that realistically delves into a difficult and complex issue. The case studies bring real people and real faces to the problem of bullying, and on both sides of the issue. It helps her unpack the school cultures that contribute to bullying, as well as what, if anything, can help in such situations.

Beyond being a well organized informative book, Sticks and Stones is also simply a compelling read. Bazelon has a great style, and knows exactly how much she can insert herself in the story without detracting from the facts she hopes to impart. Even without any current personal vested interested in precisely what goes on in high schools, I did not want to put Sticks and Stones down. Between Bazelon’s engaging prose and her ability to get to the heart of why exactly this issue is important, she had me hooked.

Very highly recommended.

For more, see my interview with Emily Bazelon in the SheKnows Book Lounge.

Buy this book from:
Powells | Indiebound*

Source: Author’s publicist.
* These links are all affiliate links. If you buy your book here I’ll make a very small amount of money that goes towards hosting, giveaways, etc.

Digiprove sealCopyright protected by Digiprove © 2013

Speechless by Hannah Harrington – Mini Book Review

Speechless by Hannah Harrington
Published by Harlequin Teen, an imprint of Harlequin 

From the publisher:

Everyone knows that Chelsea Knot can’t keep a secret

Until now. Because the last secret she shared turned her into a social outcast—and nearly got someone killed.

Now Chelsea has taken a vow of silence—to learn to keep her mouth shut, and to stop hurting anyone else. And if she thinks keeping secrets is hard, not speaking up when she’s ignored, ridiculed and even attacked is worse.

But there’s strength in silence, and in the new friends who are, shockingly, coming her way—people she never noticed before; a boy she might even fall for. If only her new friends can forgive what she’s done. If only she can forgive herself.

it would have been so very easy for Speechless to seem gimmicky. I mean, the girl whose big mouth causes a world of hurt for multiple groups of people taking a vow of silence? Please.

But when Chelsea drunkenly outs a gay classmate at a party, the consequences of her inability to stop talking are really more than she knows how to handle, so a vow of silence seems almost reasonable, if a bit dramatic. Chelsea is a high school student, though, and for some teenagers, drama is the name of the game.

What could have been simply eye roll-inducing really worked here. Chelsea doesn’t simply refuse to talk, she spends time observing, listening, and getting to know people she would have walked all over a year earlier. Her growth happens realistically, which is perhaps the main thing that makes Speechless so enjoyable and ultimately meaningful. Recommended.

For more, please see my interview with Hannah Harrington for the SheKnows Book Lounge.

Buy this book from:
Powells | Indiebound*

Source: Publisher.
* These links are all affiliate links. If you buy your book here I’ll make a very small amount of money that goes towards hosting, giveaways, etc.

Digiprove sealCopyright protected by Digiprove © 2012

So Far Away by Meg Mitchell Moore – Book Review

So Far Away by Meg Mitchell Moore
Published by Reagan Arthur Books, an imprint of Hachette

From the publisher:

Thirteen-year-old Natalie Gallagher is trying to escape: from her parents’ ugly divorce, and from the vicious cyber-bullying of her former best friend. Adrift, confused, she is a girl trying to find her way in a world that seems to either neglect or despise her. Her salvation arrives in an unlikely form: Bridget O’Connell, an Irish maid working for a wealthy Boston family. The catch? Bridget lives only in the pages of a dusty old 1920s diary Natalie unearthed in her mother’s basement. But the life she describes is as troubling – and mysterious – as the one Natalie is trying to navigate herself, almost a century later.

I am writing this down because this is my story. There were only ever two people who knew my secret, and both are gone before me.

Who was Bridget, and what became of her?

Natalie escapes into the diary, eager to unlock its secrets, and reluctantly accepts the help of library archivist Kathleen Lynch, a widow with her own painful secret: she’s estranged from her only daughter. Kathleen sees in Natalie traces of the daughter she has lost, and in Bridget, another spirited young woman at risk.

What could an Irish immigrant domestic servant from the 1920s teach them both? As the troubles of a very modern world close in around them, and Natalie’s torments at school escalate, the faded pages of Bridget’s journal unite the lonely girl and the unhappy widow – and might even change their lives forever.

So Far Away doesn’t have quite the emotional impact as Moore’s debut novel, The Arrivals. There is a bit too much going on, too many storylines for the reader to become involved in without them being tied together quite closely enough. Even so, Moore is an incredibly talented author, and So Far Away mainly suffers only in comparison to her phenomenal debut. One particularly affecting theme is Kathleen’s obsession with girls in danger, following the disappearance of her own daughter. Natalie’s story is also emotionally involving; her experience of bullying rings very true. Bridget’s story in the diary is actually the weak point, the contemporary stories are strong and there is something for everyone to relate to, because of the strength of Moore’s characterization.

Although the historical/diary storyline could have been stronger, the strength of Moore’s contemporary characters still makes this a book worth reading.

Buy this book from:
Powells | Indiebound*

Source: Publisher.
* These links are all affiliate links. If you buy your book here I’ll make a very small amount of money that goes towards hosting, giveaways, etc.

Digiprove sealCopyright protected by Digiprove © 2012